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#AcBookWeek 23-28 January 2017

A celebration of the diversity, innovation and influence of academic books


Be a part of #AcBookWeek: Organise your own event

If you’re planning an event during Academic Book Week (23-28 January), or if you’re thinking about doing so, please let us know! Please send event details, or any questions, to the Academic Book Week team at: acbookweek@midaspr.co.uk. All events during Academic Book Week will be listed on the Academic Book Week website, and promoted by the team via PR and social media. You can also follow us on @AcBookWeek for more updates.

Academic Book Week 2017 (January 23rd – 28th) is a festival of the academic book. It is organised by the British Library, The British Academy, UCL, Research Libraries UK, the Publishers Association, the Booksellers Association and the Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers. The week will see academics, booksellers, publishers, libraries and universities host events, workshops, debates, exhibitions, competitions, special offers and more, to get people talking about academic books.

Be a part of Academic Book Week, and get in touch with the team now acbookweek@midaspr.co.uk


20 Academic Books that Made Modern Britain

The first Academic Book Week took place in November 2015 and a major feature – attracting worldwide media coverage – was a list of 20 Academic Books That Changed the World; decided on by an academy with public voting promoted through academic channels to determine an overall winner.

For Academic Book Week 2017, we are looking to publish and promote a list of 20 Academic Books That Made Modern Britain and we would like you to make your suggestions by clicking here

Make your nominations by Wednesday, December 7th


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Twitter icon   @acbookweek


 

 

 


One thought on “Home

    gmiklashek950 said:
    November 12, 2015 at 10:42 am

    The complete title: “THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES BY MEANS OF NATURAL SELECTION, OR THE PRESERVATION OF FAVORED RACES IN THE STRUGGLE FOR LIFE”. Also, my favorite book, of which I once owned three separate editions, including a first. I have never had the pleasure of meeting another person who has actually read this brilliant work. However, Mr. Darwin promised to explore the “checks to increase” of mankind, but never, to my knowledge, did so. Particularly amusing is the steadfast hold of current evolutionists to the concept of evolution driven by “individual selection” and their contempt for “group selection”. Please re-read the full title of Mr. Darwin’s iconic book, restated above, and guess what Mr. Darwin would have thought of this utterly uninformed prejudice. By the way, Mr. Darwin’s use of the word “race” is synonymous with “species”, so natural selection is driven by the “struggle for life” between “races” (i.e., species). Honestly, I’ve never met an American evolutionary biologist who has read Mr. Darwin or understands evolution, including, by the way, the Englishman Mr. Dawkins. Oh well, it’s still a great book and should be read by one and all. We live in a new Dark Age when it comes to any serious reading of non-fiction books. Kindle on!

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